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Who’s Responsible for Repaying Student Loans? (responsibilities and accountability of students vs. parents and types of loans)

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Thu, Feb 4, 2016 @ 12:24 AM

whoisresponsible.jpg

Thanks to the availability of scholarships and loans, college is a dream that is available to many. Both public and private loans help thousands of students each year to attend institutions of higher learning. Before you sign on the dotted line however, you should look deeper into the details of your loan information, to be sure you know the associated responsibilities when it comes to repayment.

Discussion With Parents

When you begin the college application process, it’s a good idea to sit down with your parent or legal guardian and discuss finances. How much are they able/willing to contribute? Will your parents take out their own loans, or will you be responsible for financing your education? Having this conversation from the beginning is imperative, to ensure you are all on the same page when it comes to paying for higher education.

Loan Options To Consider

When possible, look into federal loans before considering private loans. These typically have a lower interest rate, offer more flexible repayment options (including income-based plans), and often do not require a cosigner. Federal loans do not enter repayment until you have graduated or stopped attending school at least half-time. And in many cases, there is a grace period before you must begin repayment.

For Parents

If your parents are eligible, they can take out a Federal Direct PLUS Loan. These loans are the responsibility of the borrower (your parents) and have a fixed interest rate. Your parents will repay these loans, but payments don’t begin until you have completed college. If your parents are found ineligible for a PLUS loan, you may be able to borrow an increased amount through Direct Unsubsidized Loans. As an independent or graduate student, you may be eligible to borrow your own PLUS loans.

For Students

Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized loans allow you to borrow up to $12500 per academic year. The specific amount is based on your year of study and other factors (including parent PLUS loan eligibility). Subsidized loans are based on financial need, while unsubsidized loans are not. Direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans are taken out by the student, who is responsible for repaying them following departure from university, or failure to attend at least half time.

Perkins loans are a third type of loan you may be eligible for as a student. These are your own responsibility and you can borrow as much as $5500 per year.

Private Loans

If necessary, private loans are available for parent or student borrowers. These often have high interest rates and inflexible repayment terms, and loans may be based on credit and the availability of a cosigner.

How Financial Aid is Determined

To find out your loan eligibility, you and your family must complete your FAFSA as well as apply for financial aid to your prospective colleges. When you’ve been admitted, the school will send you an award letter, detailing the total cost of attendance, any scholarships or grants awarded, and what you have been found eligible to borrow.

Working with College Planning ABC may save you a considerable amount on your university education. Contact us today for more details. 

 

Tags: college planning abc, College Planning News, cost of attending college, Manuel Fabriquer, student loans

Dissecting the Different Types of Federal Student Loans

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Tue, Feb 2, 2016 @ 9:59 PM
Student Loans

For most families of college-bound students, higher education presents a significant expense. In this competitive job market however, a college education is a huge, and often necessary asset, and so students and their parents work hard to make it happen. Fortunately, there is an abundance of opportunities when it comes to financing your studies.

Scholarships and grants are the first consideration for up and coming university freshmen. These are monetary gifts from schools, organizations, or the government (as in the case of the Pell Grant) that do not need to be repaid.

Yet after these resources have been exhausted, and your family financial contribution taken into account, you may be found eligible for some federal loans. While these are a useful option for funding your studies, it is important to understand the facts before you borrow. Let’s take a look at the different types of federal loans available.

Loan Basics

There are many benefits to taking out federal loans as opposed to loans from private lenders. Some of the advantages include:

  •  Flexible repayment options including income based or graduated repayment

  • Lower interest rates than private loans

  • In most cases, no cosigner or credit check required

  • Loan repayment does not begin until you’ve graduated or stopped attending at least half-time

You can borrow between $5500 and $12500 each undergraduate year with Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized loans. How much you can borrow is dependent on specific circumstances such as your year of study. Additionally, you may be eligible for as much as $5500 per year in Perkins Loans.

After completing your FAFSA and submitting a financial aid application to your school, you’ll receive an award letter. This will let you know the total cost of attendance, what you’ve received in the form of gift aid, and what you are eligible to borrow. It’s good to remember that you only should borrow as much as you need. This is often less than the amount your school offers you.

Dissecting the Loans

Stafford Loans are the most well known type of federal student loan. These are split into two types: subsidized and unsubsidized. Subsidized loans depend on your family’s financial situation and are based on need. While you are enrolled in school at least part-time, interest does not build on subsidized loans. Unsubsidized loans come with a higher interest rate, and they start accruing interest from disbursement. Students do not need to demonstrate financial need to receive Unsubsidized loans.

Direct PLUS Loans are a third loan option. These fixed interest rate loans can be taken on by parents of dependent undergraduate students or graduate/professional students. If parents take out the PLUS loan, they will be responsible for its repayment. However, they do not need to make payments until you are finished with school.

Perkins Loans are a fourth type of loan, based on need, and include a 5% interest rate. Perkins Loans may be eligible for loan forgiveness following your graduation from college. Certain public service jobs can help you qualify as well as Peace Corps service and other opportunities. The criteria are fairly specific for loan forgiveness programs, but are worth looking into.

 

More questions about financing college? Get in touch with us now! 

Tags: strategies for college, college planning abc, college planning, college applications, cost of attending college, money for college, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college, cost of college

5 Benefits of Working With a College Planner

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Wed, Oct 7, 2015 @ 10:05 PM

College Planner

 

1.    A well-honed application that shines.

Top college consultants have years of experience helping students apply to and be accepted at great institutions. With hundreds of thousands of students applying to schools each academic year, competition for admission is tougher than ever. You need the expertise of someone who knows just what admission committees are looking for and how to make sure your application fits the bill. At College Planning ABC, we can help you edit and polish your essay, ensure your application highlights your strengths, and even practice your interview skills with you, to make sure you’re fully prepared.

 

2.    A streamlined, less stressful process.

Applying to college can seem overwhelming. It can be a challenge to even know where to begin. A college planner can assist you every step of the way. From researching and narrowing down a list of schools to making sure you fill out all the correct forms and submit them on time, a college planner helps take the pressure off of what can often be a stressful time. With a college planner on your side, you can have a successful college application process and still have time to make the most of enjoying your senior year.

 

3.    A second pair of (expert) eyes.

Forms, forms, forms. It can feel like the college application process is all about paperwork. When applying to several different schools, it is tough to keep track of all those bits and pieces. It’s even harder to avoid missing something or making a careless error. When you work with an accomplished college planner, you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing you’ve got support on your side. We can review all of your documents, complete the CSS Profile, make adjustments and confirm the accuracy of your Student Aid Report (SAR), and help you with any other important forms, both academic and financial.

 

4.    The chance to save money.

A premier college planner offers one special advantage that you can’t get anywhere else: the opportunity to potentially save thousands of dollars on your student’s higher education. From finding lesser known scholarships to providing expert advice on loans and financing, the experience of a qualified college planner gives you a significant resource to work with. At College Planning ABC, a great many of our clients have saved an incredible amount of money on their education. We may be able to help you do the same!

 

5.    You can dream big.

At College Planning ABC, we’ve helped thousands of students realize their dreams. In fact, many families come to us with modest expectations, unsure of how to begin and what to strive for. Together, we show students the possibilities out there for them, aid them in identifying opportunities for scholarships and grants, and give them the tools they need to have a truly successful application season. There are more options available than many students realize, and their ambitions are indeed within their reach. Sometimes all it takes is a little guidance. We can’t guarantee you’ll be admitted to the institution of your choice, but we can promise that we’ll help you dream big and allow you to have the best possible shot at achieving your goals.

 

Our Approach

With these 5 benefits and many more to boot, it’s clear that working with a college consultant can give you a tremendous advantage. At College Planning ABC, we guarantee to provide (on time) all of the services listed on our college planning agreement. At the conclusion of your partnership with us, if you are not 100% satisfied, you can request your money back. We believe so strongly in the quality of our services that this is our promise to you.

 

Ready to start the application process? Get in touch with us today. 

 

Tags: strategies for college, college planning abc, college planning, college applications, College Planning News, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college

6 Things to Consider When Choosing a College

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Thu, Sep 3, 2015 @ 11:22 PM

Choose College PHOTO

If you’re a junior or younger in high school, you’re still in the phase of narrowing down your options. Here are 6 important aspects of a college or university to consider when making your selections.

 1.      Class Size

For the best educational experience, a smaller class size is nearly always preferred. A lower student to teacher ratio generally means more one-on-one time with faculty and more personalized attention: always a plus to help you on the road to better learning. Private colleges and universities tend to have a reputation for smaller class size (and a lower overall student population), while large state universities more commonly offer 200+ student lectures, particularly in your first and second year. The average class size at your school will also depend upon your chosen major, as some are less common. Class size may not be the most vital element on your pros and cons list, but you should definitely give it some thought.

 2.     Location

So many students can’t wait to take off for college and go far from home. Others prefer staying closer to home. Remaining a few hours’ drive from parents or loved ones can be a great support, but striking out on your own can foster tremendous independence. Which option works for you depends on your specific needs. But don’t just consider proximity to family. Take a look at where the college or university is located geographically and within its city or town. Will you be bored with a small town feel? Some private colleges are nestled away in areas far from major cities which limits activities but can make for a more close-knit, centralized college experience. Would you prefer an urban environment, where your campus is in the heart of it all? You’ll never run out of things to do and places to go, but you may miss out on that more traditional “college” feel. Consider these factors and how they’ll impact your college experience.

3.     Program Reputation or Variety of Programs

Do you already know what you want to study? You are probably considering colleges and universities which offer great programs in your chosen field. For focused students ready to tackle a specific major, the quality and reputation of their chosen program will likely weigh heavily in their decision-making process. Look for programs that offer a variety of options, unique opportunities for students, and a supportive alumni system. This can be instrumental to you when you head out into the job field. For those students still undecided on a major or course of study (a situation which is very common), you may want to consider schools with a wide range of majors to choose from. This will give you plenty of options as you narrow down your educational path. You might also want to take a close look at schools that offer special programs to freshmen. Some colleges have first year programs designed to help you discover your passions and choose the right major for you.

4.     Living Options

Dorm life is a huge part of the college experience for most students. If visiting a college you’re considering, make sure to take a tour of the residence halls. You’ll be living in one of these for at least one or two of your college years, if not all. Clean and safe dorm environments are important to most students and their families. Perhaps specific living requirements are important to you, like substance-free dorms or single sex dorms. Be sure to investigate all your residence options carefully, to make sure you have the best chance at finding a pleasant living situation that meets your needs. Also, make sure to see if your chosen university guarantees housing for students. Some schools, mostly those in big cities, do not guarantee housing for upper classmen. You should discuss with your family if finding your own housing will be workable, financially and otherwise.

5.     Financial Aid

With the rising cost of higher education, financial aid is typically one of the most important factors students consider when deciding which college to attend. Finances are a personal matter and you’ll have to weigh the cost of each schools benefits versus its associated costs with your parents or other financial support systems. Upon admission to a university, carefully check your financial aid award letter to see what grants, scholarships, and loan options you have. Don’t forget to apply for outside scholarships. Don’t let money be a deterrent for receiving a college education. There are thousands of schools out there that are affordable and there are countless opportunities for securing the funds you need to attend any school.

 6.     Clubs & Activities

Lastly, do some research into what societies, clubs, and activities are available at the schools on your list. College and university life is about academics, of course, but also about making lasting friendships and having meaningful experiences. Sports, academic societies, Greek life, and clubs can all round out the college experience and help make your 4 years unforgettable. Your university should have a list of clubs and societies on their website, and often the contact information for the club officers is listed. Reach out to these students for more information on activities that interest you. This will help you see what kind of extracurriculars you may want to get involved in, and could help make your final decision that much easier. 

Tags: strategies for college, college planning abc, college planning, college applications, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college

How Many Colleges Should I Apply To For My College Admissions?

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Tue, Sep 1, 2015 @ 8:51 PM
HowManyPhoto

If you’re entering your senior year of high school this fall, you may have begun to give some serious thought to your college applications. Perhaps you’ve already visited some schools last year or over the summer. Maybe you have a few tours planned for the next few months, but haven’t yet fallen for any one university. No matter where you are in the process, the following question will inevitably enter your mind:

How many colleges should I apply to?

While there’s no simple answer or magic number, most college admissions experts and counselors agree that a realistic number is between 8 and 12 institutions. Less than that may be tempting fate, and more than that may be overdoing it. Let’s take a closer look.

All Eggs, One Basket

First off, let’s agree that it’s generally not a great idea to apply to a single school, particularly if it’s not one that accepts nearly every student. Some students choose to do this, and they are accepted and attend that institution. But what if the school you’ve selected doesn’t accept you? Or what if you change your mind and wish you’d considered more options? Even as you narrow down your picks, it’s a smart idea to keep the doors open for a few different opportunities.

Some Considerations

A lot of students like to “diversify” their applications by considering several different criteria. You might apply to different schools based on variations in location, cost, programs, and more. Perhaps you’d like a good mix of public and private universities. All these approaches are wise. The more diverse your prospective schools, the more options you’ll have as acceptances come rolling in. As well, many students find their opinions and interests change somewhat over the course of their senior year. Having a range of school choices may prove wise when you discover you’re suddenly not keen to go to that out of state college.

Reaches, Matches, and Safeties

Another way to “diversify” your applications is to choose a mix of schools that represent a tier of selectivity or difficulty. Ivy leagues and top private universities may be “reach” schools for most students. Even those with stellar academics and impeccable records aren’t guaranteed ivy admission. So these reaches are colleges you know you have a shot at getting into. These are the schools you cross your fingers for!

“Match” schools are those which should likely make up the bulk of your applications. Match schools are those in which you fall inside the statistics of the average admitted student. You have a fairly good chance of being accepted at these institutions.

And finally, “safety” schools are those which you know accept large numbers of applicants and which probably do not have overly rigorous admission standards. Applying to one or two of these is a way of “hedging your bets.”

Why Not Too Many?

Applying to dozens of schools may seem at first glance like a great way to turn the odds in your favor. But in reality, this isn’t the wisest move. Adding more applications can be a financial burden (with high application fees at some colleges) and also may equate to less attention given to each application. This could, in effect, reduce your chances of acceptance. Lastly, applying to an overlarge number of schools could simply add additional, unneeded stress to your life.

 

Looking for advice on what schools are the right choice for you? Contact us today at College Planning ABC, the leading Bay Area college consultant. 

Tags: strategies for college, college planning abc, college consulting, college planning, college applications, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college

What Should I Write About For My College Admissions Essay?

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Tue, Sep 1, 2015 @ 10:08 AM
what to write

There are many facets to a successful college application. Grades and test scores, recommendation letters, and interview are only a few of the elements taken into consideration by admissions committees. There is also another important part, and it is one that gives you a chance to share who you are: the admission essay.

High school seniors often panic about writing the essay. With word limits to think about and admissions officers to impress, the essay can seem like it may make or break your admission decision. While a poor essay won’t necessarily ruin your chances of getting into your dream school, it is definitely one aspect that can give you a much-needed edge. So what should you write about? In the end, it’s less about what you write than about how you write it, and even more importantly, who shines through the essay: you!

Get (Kinda) Personal

An admissions essay is not like a research paper or book report. Instead, it is a story. The admission committee wants to read your words and immediately know who you are and what you’d bring to their campus. The more personal you can be, the better. This demonstrates you as a likeable, open, authentic, and genuine person; one who will be an asset to their institution. Your story should be personal and meaningful to you, but it shouldn’t delve into territory that is too uncomfortable. You want to make the readers feel moved, but not put them off with oversharing.

Stand Out

Admissions teams are tired of reading the same old essay over and over again. Many topics are overdone (sports championships, cliche volunteer stories). Consider something fresh, but something that is unique and truly you. If the university offers a prompt for the essay, you’ve already won half the battle. Now, spend some time and come up with a great answer, perhaps one with an innovative perspective that they won’t expect.

Write in Your Own Voice

The admissions essay is not your opportunity to impress (well, maybe a little). It should be clear that you can communicate well with the written word and that you can easily share your views. But leave the “showing off” for other areas of your application such as academic transcripts and lists of achievements. The essay should delve into who you truly are. One of the best ways to do this is to write in your own voice. Avoid slangs and colloquialisms, but try and write in a way that’s similar to how you speak. Don’t bother filling your essay with lengthy vocabulary words you would never use in everyday life. This comes across and disingenuous and most likely doesn’t reflect who you are as a high school student. 

Write About Something That Matters to You

If you only had a few minutes to tell an admissions committee about yourself, what would you say? What story would you tell? The answer to that question may reveal the ideal topic for your essay. A strong essay should have a beginning, middle, and end, and ideally include a conflict or struggle. Showing how you dealt with a challenge in your life is always a great starting point, as is writing about a significant life event that shaped you or changed you. 

Tags: college planning abc, college consulting, college planning, college applications, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, college admission essay, admission essays

I’m Lost: Where to Begin in the College Admissions Process?

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Thu, Aug 27, 2015 @ 4:41 PM
im lost

So the time has come. It’s time for you (or your son or daughter) to start thinking about college. Most students begin this process around their junior year of high school, but some families like to start even sooner. But what do you do when the college application process totally baffles you? Here’s a quick guide to taking your very first steps in the college search.

Figuring Out Who You Are (For Now)

Before you even begin thinking about where you’ll go and what you’ll study, stop and take some time to consider who you are right now. What do you really want from your college experience? Do you dream of heading across the country? Perhaps you want a very traditional college experience with lots of fraternities and sororities? Or maybe academia is your priority and you’re aiming high with Ivy League and other top tier schools? Before you research any programs or universities, make lists of what you’d like in your higher education experience, what type of atmosphere you most desire, and perhaps even what kind of environment you think would be best for your personality and temperament.

Time for a Family Meeting

Next up is a thorough discussion between parents and student. What do your parents envision for your future? Are your dreams and goals in line? If not, how can you compromise? It is vital to talk about the college process early, to avoid arguments later on and to ensure you’re all on the same page. If you plan to study 10 states away, but your parents banked on you staying closer to home, these issues will need to be worked out, and the sooner the better. This conversation, and others, is also when you should begin addressing the financial piece. What will your parents be able to contribute to your college education? Will you need to take out loans? Are you hoping for scholarships? Talking about this early on allows you to apply to the right schools that meet your situation and needs. 

Basic Research of Schools

Now that you know a little bit of what you’re looking for and have narrowed it down at least somewhat in terms of finances, it’s time for the fun part: researching colleges. If you are firmly decided on what you want to study, you may be best seeking out institutions with solid reputations in these subjects. If you’re open to a variety of majors, however, you can be a bit more versatile in your research. There are plenty of useful college search tools on the Internet, but a great place to start is Peterson’s.

Moving Forward

As you begin to hone in on some colleges and universities that interest you, your family can begin planning visits and tours. This is the best way to see whether or not a school is the right fit for you. Keep researching, too. University websites are chock full of information. You can discover so much about a school from its website, social media accounts, and even from contacting current students.

Moving forward in the college admissions process, it’s a smart idea to work with a college consultant. A consultant can be an invaluable resource when it comes to choosing colleges, applying, and making sure you have the best chance of being admitted to the school of your choice. It is a complicated process, but with help, applying to higher education is a breeze. For the top Bay Area college planner, get in touch with Manuel today at College Planning ABC.

 

Tags: strategies for college, college planning abc, college planning, college applications, College Planning News, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college

What are Colleges Looking For?

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Tue, Aug 25, 2015 @ 11:12 PM
WhatCollegePhoto

It’s no surprise that colleges these days seem to be more competitive than ever. Good grades, top SAT scores, extracurricular activities. What does it take to stand out from the crowd? When you start to plan your college application process, you may find yourself wondering exactly what colleges are looking for in their potential students. As a top Bay Area college planner, I’ve discovered firsthand just what colleges seek in their incoming classes, and I’m going to share that with you today.

Students Who Challenge Themselves

Colleges love to see that students have challenged themselves academically. If you’ve maintained a rigorous course load in high school, this looks favorable to admission officers. Schools want to know that students will be able to handle the academic challenges of their institution.

Leadership Qualities and Integrity

Universities want students of character who display strength, leadership, and a good sense of values. These insights can be gleaned from your personal essay but especially from your recommendation letters. With these, admissions counselors learn how others view you, and what their assessments may be. The best recommendations come from teachers or guidance counselors who know you well and have observed you at your best.

Consistent Academic Success

Admissions committees understand that not all students will achieve stellar marks throughout all four years of high school. However, your grades should display that you’ve given a solid effort and earned the best grades possible in the vast majority of your classes. It’s okay to start out a little weaker academically, as long as your transcript displays an upward trend.

Community & School Involvement

Most schools want you to be more than just a terrific student. They want to know you’ve made your mark in your high school and your community. Being involved in sports, clubs, and extracurricular activities, particularly if you’ve played a leadership role, adds a great deal to your application. While in high school, you should also strive to make community service and volunteering a part of your routine. This looks good on applications, of course, but more importantly, helps you to grow and become a better, more mature individual.

Something Special

Your chance to shine may come in the guise of your admissions essay. This unique and revealing glimpse into your life shows more than just what’s on the page. Go beyond your resume and academic achievements. Select a topic that isn’t overdone and share your personal story. Show what makes you different than other students; what makes you an individual. Something that the admissions committee can relate to and/or find memorable goes a long way. Your essay provides a look at who you really are and what you’ll bring to the campus community.

A Good Fit

What universities look for depends a great deal on the institution itself. Some place higher importance on academics while others seek to build a well-rounded, diverse student body. It’s important, therefore, to tailor your application for each college, while still staying true to who you are and what you offer.

Getting In

With some hard work and smart approaches (as well as working with a knowledgeable and experienced college consultant), you will find the application process to be a breeze. And if you’ve got what it takes, you’re sure to shine as an outstanding potential student.

Tags: strategies for college, college planning abc, college planning, college applications, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college

Summer: A Great Opportunity for College Visits

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Tue, Jun 23, 2015 @ 9:17 PM

describe the image

If you’re a rising junior, senior, or ambitious high school underclassman, you may be considering college visits over the next several months. While you might decide touring in the autumn is a better option (classes fully in session), there are a number of advantages to touring in the summer season.

You can completely focus on your visit.

Visiting in the summer allows you to absorb the experience distraction free. If you wait to visit once school has started, you’ll be dealing with homework, exams, college applications, extracurricular activities, and more. Your focus may wander a bit with so much on your mind. Yet if you visit during your break, you can explore the campus unencumbered.

The university campus will be less crowded.

In the summertime, colleges quiet down quite a bit. If you’re looking to get the real student experience, visiting when the semester’s in session might be preferable. However, in the summer, you can wander the buildings and grounds with no one in your way. This could be advantageous to exploring a place more deeply.

You can have a more personalized visit.

Most colleges still offer official tours throughout the summer months, yet chances are you might be the only family signed up. This can be a real benefit to you. Tour guides are almost always students, and with their full attention, you can ask all the burning questions you have about majors, dorms, or even the social scene. The tour guide can also take a longer time with you and take you to the precise campus locations you most want to see.

You may be able to have conversations with professors or administrators.

Though many professors spend summers away from their institutions, you may be lucky enough to find a few on campus during a summertime visit. If so, you could have the opportunity to speak with them about courses, programs, and more. At certain colleges, you may even be able to have an official interview during your visit. This can help showcase your interest in a school and get your name somewhat “known” amongst administrators.

Summertime college visits could be part of your vacation.

If your family was planning on a summer trip, why not throw a college visit into the itinerary? This is a fantastic idea, particularly if your dream school is fairly far from your hometown. Bring along the whole family, and make a holiday of it. As a bonus, you’ll get to more deeply experience the town or city the college is located within, and you’ll be able to spend a longer time period checking the place out.

Make sure to call ahead.

If you do choose to plan a college visit during the summertime, be sure and contact the school’s admission department directly. Often, schedules can vary in the summer, so you want to be sure someone will be there to greet you and give you a tour. Otherwise, you may end up knocking on a locked door.

Have you visited universities during the summer months? Any tips for making it a great experience? Let us know in the comments below!

Tags: college planning abc, Undergraduate, college planning, Manuel Fabriquer, College Admissions, attending college, getting a college degree, High school sophomores

The Summer Before College: What You Should Do

Posted by Manuel Fabriquer on Wed, Jun 10, 2015 @ 10:04 AM

Before College 

Over the next few weeks, high school will be wrapping up for seniors all across the country. This can be a bittersweet time, as students leave the halls where they’ve spent 4 years to move on to bigger and better things. With summer on the horizon, you’ve completed your applications, been accepted by your university, and have submitted your deposit. All that stands between you and the college life is 3 blissful months, right?

 Well, that is mostly true. College is going to be a wonderful experience and you should fill these summer days of freedom with lots of fun and memories. At the same time, there are several vital things not to neglect during those sunny days. Here are a few important details to keep track of and tasks to get done before you begin your journey through higher education. 

Register for classes

Over the summer, you’ll start growing more integrated into your college or university. You’ll receive your student email, be invited to orientation, and will have access to your course catalog. Now the fun begins! Choosing classes can be really enjoyable. You get to select the courses you’re excited about taking and you have the ability to fully design your academic schedule. When you’ve decided on your courses and laid out a schedule, register as soon as possible. Freshman courses often fill up quickly (particularly the classes that don’t start at 8am!) and you’ll want your pick of the litter.

Purchase textbooks

Although it isn’t absolutely necessary to purchase your textbooks prior to arriving on campus, doing so can help you avoid the stress of buying them your first week of classes. Shopping online rather than at your college bookstore can also save you a great deal of money. Check out Half.com, eBay’s spot for used and discounted textbooks.

Shop for your dorm

Now is your chance to release the interior designer within. If you’re living in the campus dorms, your room will be your cozy home for the next year. You want it to feel comfortable, homey, and organized. In addition to bedding, lamps, trash cans, laundry baskets, office supplies, and more, you may want to consider space-saving options like beneath-the-bed storage boxes or bed risers to give you even more room to store your stuff. Target is a wonderful one-stop-shop for dorm goodies. 

Research career options if you haven’t settled on a major (or even if you have).

Summertime gives you plenty of lazy hours to sunbathe, read, swim, play, and think. In between your diversions, take some time to consider your future career path. If you haven’t chosen a major yet, no need to worry. Many schools don’t require you to declare a major in your first year. If you’re undecided, start researching careers and see what draws you. This is a great thing to do before registering for classes, as you might want to select a range of classes to sample your interests.

Discuss a budget with your family 

Before heading off into the great wide world, it’s important to sit down with your parents and discuss your college budget. How much will they provide for you each month? Are there restrictions on what you can and cannot purchase? It’s necessary to be upfront about these things from the start, to ensure potential issues don’t occur. 

Learn how to do laundry and cook simple meals 

If you’re heading away to college, your parents won’t be around to cook your meals or clean your clothes. Learn to do laundry the right way before you come face to face with a confusing, coin-operated washing machine.

You may be planning to get most of your food from your university dining hall, but if you’ve got a kitchen in your dorm or apartment, you’ll want to learn to prepare some basic meals. Ask your mom to teach you some of your favorite recipes. This means you can also create the taste of a home-cooked meal when you’re in need of a little comfort.

Now, bearing these tips in mind, go forth and have a super fantastic summer! 

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